Chefchaouen – The Blue City

Chefchaouen’s blue walls are a popular subject of interest. There are several theories as to why the walls were painted blue. One popular theory is that the blue keeps mosquitos away. The blue is said to symbolize the sky and heaven, and serve as a reminder to lead a spiritual life. However, according to some locals, the walls were mandated to be painted blue simply to attract tourists at some point in the 1970s.

The growing tourist industry is geared especially towards Spanish tourists, who are numerous during great Catholic feasts like Semana Santa and Christmas.

Places of worship
The city’s oldest and historically most important mosque is the Great Mosque located at Place Uta Hammam at the heart of the medina. [10] On a hill overlooking the town to the east there is also a disaffected mosque built by the Spanish in the 1920s, now a popular lookout point. [11]

Also of great historical and religious importance to the city is the mausoleum dedicated to the patron saint of northern Morocco’s Jebalah region, Moulay Abdessalam Ben Mshish al-Alami. His tomb and the village surrounding it is roughly 50 kilometers northwest of from Chefchaouen on the old road to Larache.

Tourism

A souvenir from Chaouen
The beauty of Chefchaouen’s mountainous surroundings are enhanced by the contrast of the brightly painted medina (old town). It is this beauty and the relaxed atmosphere of the town that makes Chefchaouen very attractive to visitors.

The main square in the medina is lined with cafes and filled to the brim with locals and tourist mingling easily. During the summer approximately 200 hotels cater to the influx of European tourists.

If you are interested in visiting theBlue City, please see our tours, to see the tours that pass through Chefchaouen and to book. or just click on the WhatsApp botton. or contact us by Email or Instagram

 

source: wikipedia

02:21 – DIM-06-SEPT –2020

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. All fields are required.